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5 things the Galaxy Note 10 got wrong: the iPhone 11 has a chance
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5 things the Galaxy Note 10 got wrong: the iPhone 11 has a chance

The Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Plus are finally here, and while we here at Trusted Reviews found plenty to like about Samsung’s latest flagship family of phablets, there’s no getting round the fact it has also gotten a fair few things wrong. Here’s our pick of the five worst offenders.

1. The Galaxy Note 10 isn’t unique

The Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10 Plus are technical beasts, featuring a wealth of top-end hardware, but aside from the improved CPU, there’s one key problem: we’ve seen it all before.

If you take away the tweaked aesthetics, sprinkle of custom S Pen features and fast charging, you’ll find most of the Galaxy Note 10 and Note 10 Plus’ core specs are the same as those of the Galaxy S10-family of devices.

This isn’t a bad thing, as the specs are still top notch. What this does mean, though, is that the Note 10 lacks any real wow factor and, like the Galaxy S10, it doesn’t have any unique selling point to differentiate it from the sea of impressive contenders already on the market.

Related: Best phones 2019

2. The Galaxy Note 10 should have had a better camera

The camera is a key offender in this regard. Don’t get me wrong, the Galaxy S10’s camera is good and more than fine for most people. But it doesn’t cut the mustard against key rivals, like the Huawei P30 Pro.

This is why we were really hoping Samsung would tweak the setup on the Note 10 and Note 10 Plus. Instead it loaded the Note 10 with an identical tri-camera system to the regular S10 and the Note 10 Plus with the same setup as the Galaxy S10 5G – which adds a time of flight (ToF) sensor to the mix.

Again, this isn’t the worst thing in the world. But with the Huawei Mate 30 Pro rumoured to have a super-charged new tri-camera setup with two giant 40-megapixel sensors, I’d have liked Samsung to have tried a little harder with the Galaxy Note 10’s camera.

3. No microSD? Seriously Samsung?

Most people don’t use up all the storage on their phone, but I’ve always been a fan of phones with microSD card slots. For one, they make it quick and easy to physically move files from one device to another.

Having access to more storage space to download movies in preparation for a long haul flight, for example, is also always a welcome feature – especially on phablets with a screen as beautiful as the Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy Note 10 Plus’.

This is why I’m slightly annoyed to see Samsung cut the input out of the Galaxy Note 10’s design – it’s like the 3.5mm headphone jack debacle is happening all over again…

Related: Best Samsung phone 2019

4. Why is a 45W charger not in the box?

Support for 45W fast charging is awesome. You know what’s not? Having to pay extra for a separate charger to do it after making a big song and dance about it at the Note 10’s launch event.

Instead of following Huawei’s example with the P30 Pro, Samsung’s shipping the phone with a basic 25W charger, and asking you to pay extra if you want to take advantage of the faster 45W support. On a phone that already costs £1000 this feels a little cheeky.

Related: Best phablet 2019

5. Where’s the Galaxy Note 10e?

Speaking of pricing, where is the Galaxy Note 10e? The Galaxy S10e was a stroke of genius by Samsung – letting buyers get most of the key benefits of the regular Galaxy S10, but at a considerably more reasonable price.

The combo worked a treat and made the S10e the Samsung phone we recommend to most people. Which is why I was really hoping Samsung would pull the same trick with the Galaxy Note 10. Sadly this wasn’t the case and, once again, if you want Samsung’s phablet you’ll need to part with a lot of £10 notes – around 100 to be precise.

This could also cause long-term damage the Note 10’s chances of success. As we saw in Samsung and Apple’s last quarterly financials, people aren’t exactly queuing up at the door to by £1000 phones at the moment.

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